Buscar
 
 

Resultados por:
 


Rechercher Búsqueda avanzada

Últimos temas
Navegación
 Portal
 Índice
 Miembros
 Perfil
 FAQ
 Buscar

Tomgram: Michael Klare, The Oil Rush to Hell

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Tomgram: Michael Klare, The Oil Rush to Hell

Mensaje  Cior el Lun Jun 07, 2010 7:21 am

[TomDispatch Follow-Up: Three weeks ago, Noam Chomsky wrote a blistering piece at TomDispatch, “Eyeless in Gaza,” on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It might be worth a reread or catch his TomCast audio interview here. This week, the 81-year-old Chomsky got a firsthand taste of the situation there when Israel’s Interior Ministry refused his daughter and him entry into Israel and the West Bank. He was to give a talk at Bir Zeit University near Ramallah and his rejection ostensibly came, in part, because he was not lecturing at an Israeli university as well (though he has done so many times in the past). By now, practically an international incident, it caught something of the depressingly extreme mood of the moment in Israel.]

It took President Obama 24 days to finally get publicly angry and “rip” into BP and its partners for the catastrophic oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. What was he waiting for? The pattern has been obvious enough: however bad you thought it was, or anyone said it was at any given moment, it’s worse (and will get worse yet). Just take the numbers.

In the first days after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded on April 20th, reports from the Coast Guard and BP indicated that no oil was leaking into the Gulf from the damaged well. Then, the oil giant reported that, actually, about 1,000 barrels a day were coming out of it. Almost immediately the federal government raised that figure to 5,000 barrels, which remained the generally accepted estimate until, under pressure, BP finally released a dramatic 30-second clip of the actual leak at the wellhead. By then, according to ABC News, both the company and the White House had had access to the video for three weeks and obviously knew that the gold-standard estimate was wrong by a country mile. Since then, estimates by scientists viewing the video clip (who have been prevented by BP from visiting the site itself, looking at more material, or taking more accurate measurements), run from 25,000 barrels to a staggering 70,000 barrels a day or more -- up to, that is, 3.4 million gallons of oil daily, which would mean an Exxon Valdez-sized spill every few days.

The BP disaster in the Gulf may prove historic in the worst sense -- especially since much of its damage still remains out of sight, hidden below the surface of the Gulf’s waters in what already are gigantic plumes of oil in the water column going down 4,000 feet that threaten to rob Gulf waters of oxygen and create vast dead zones in areas previously rich in sea life. Simply put, this is scary stuff, environmental damage on a scale we don’t normally contemplate. And it’s probably just a start, given that whatever news story comes next only seems to have more of the same -- including the fact that the Obama administration’s Interior Department followed in the infamous footsteps of the Bush administration. In 2009, it “exempted BP's calamitous Gulf of Mexico drilling operation from a detailed environmental impact analysis.” (And, of course, mere weeks before the explosion, the president was urging yet more deep-water off-shore drilling and reassuring Americans that it wasn’t terribly dangerous, while less than two weeks before its oil rig blew, BP was vigorously lobbying to expand its exemptions.)

At TomDispatch, Michael Klare, author of the invaluable Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy, has been warning for years that the easy oil and natural gas energy reserves on Planet Earth are quickly disappearing and that we’re entering a “tough oil” era. Thanks to the depletion of other crucial natural resources as well, the century to come is likely to prove more extreme in many ways, including the climate. BP has given us an unfortunate taste of that extremity. And that’s at only 5,000 feet below the waves. What will happen when BP starts drilling down 35,000 feet under the Gulf for the giant oil reserves it’s dubbed Tiber, located some 250 miles southeast of Houston, and something goes wrong? Hold your hats. Simply put, this is the path to hell. When will an “angry” president really mobilize the government to deal with this disaster (and the others to come)? Tom


TomDispatch.com
avatar
Cior
Editor

Mensajes : 3986
Fecha de inscripción : 10/02/2010
Edad : 53
Localización : Zaragoza

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Tomgram: Michael Klare, The Oil Rush to Hell

Mensaje  Ziber el Lun Jun 07, 2010 7:47 am

Desgraciadamente, ya nada nos llama la atención. Incluso ni una fuga que expulsa el equivalente al vertido del Exxon Valdez cada pocos días (y hay que recordar la que se lió entonces).
avatar
Ziber
Admin

Mensajes : 7188
Fecha de inscripción : 10/02/2010
Edad : 47
Localización : Una aldea

Ver perfil de usuario http://huelgageneral.gratis-foro.es

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Tomgram: Michael Klare, The Oil Rush to Hell

Mensaje  Cior el Lun Jun 07, 2010 9:12 am

Pero es que me da que el tema es más serio de lo que nos cuentan.

Por ahí he leído que la tragedia es similar a las dimensiones de Chernobyl.
avatar
Cior
Editor

Mensajes : 3986
Fecha de inscripción : 10/02/2010
Edad : 53
Localización : Zaragoza

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Tomgram: Michael Klare, The Oil Rush to Hell

Mensaje  Contenido patrocinado


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.